Verrio Tour Provides a Window into a Historic School

Verrio Tour guides Nana, Max, Rebecca and Helena with The Verrio at Christ’s Hospital
Verrio Tour guides Nana, Max, Rebecca and Helena with The Verrio at Christ’s Hospital

This week I am in the company of four Christ’s Hospital students who are part of a cohort of pupils who lead The Verrio Tours at the school. The Verrio Tours provide visitors with a rare window into the, history, traditions and life of this historic institution.

Detail of Antonio Verrio?s 'The granting of the Royal Charter by Charles II to the Royal Mathematical School' in the Dining Hall at Christ's Hospital. Pub Orig CL 21/04/2005
Part of Antonio Verrio?s ‘The granting of the Royal Charter by Charles II to the Royal Mathematical School’ in the Dining Hall at Christ’s Hospital.
Pub Orig CL 21/04/2005

Helena, Rebecca, Nana and Max explain how The Verrio Tours take their name from the eighty-six foot long painting by the Italian born artist Antonio Verrio (c.1636-1707) who received royal patronage from both Charles II and James II.

They tell me how this painting commemorates the founding of the Royal Mathematical School by Charles II in 1673 and is known as The Verrio. It hung in two of the school’s Great Halls in London before being brought to the new campus at Horsham in the first years of the 20th century. Today the painting hangs in the Dining Hall.

The Verrio painting
The Verrio painting

My enthusiastic guides describe how Charles II died during its painting. 17th century convention dictated that only a ruling monarch could be depicted on the throne. To avoid a treasonous act James II was painted in Charles’ place at the centre of the composition. To the left of the throne you can see Samuel Pepys who became the Chief Secretary to the Admiralty under both Charles II and James II. He is painted wearing a red cloak and holding a large book.

Our conversation turns to the breadth of the tour which gives the visitor an opportunity to explore Christ’s Hospital’s unique campus and buildings including the ‘Wren’ Portico, the Chapel with its wonderful Frank Brangwyn murals and, weather permitting, witness the famous School Band in action.

I ask how visitors react to the experience, Rebecca responds “Everyone wants to know about the school.” Nana continues “People are fascinated by what you are saying.” Max concludes “The Verrio Tour gives the outside world a chance to look in.” It quickly becomes apparent how much these outward facing and generous young people enjoy sharing Christ’s Hospital with others.

This quality of welcome is always evident when you visit Christ’s Hospital.

Our discussion turns to life at the school. I remark upon how people from diverse backgrounds seem to be welcomed and celebrated. Helena agrees and says “There is a real mix of backgrounds here. When we start the only common ground is our academic ability.” She goes on to explain how the shared history and traditions of Christ’s Hospital builds respect and friendships.

I ask what they most enjoy about the tours and they are unanimous that it is meeting with the public.

This inclusive school continues to celebrate its history and traditions whilst looking confidently to the future. Most importantly and above all else it celebrates its students – the talented young people who are shaped and inspired by its traditions and the quality of its education.

An afternoon in the company of these outward facing and generous young people is really inspiring.

The Verrio Tours are available on Thursdays by prior arrangement only. To discover more visit www.christs-hospital.org.uk/school-life/community/verrio-tours/ or to book a tour telephone Michelle Smith on 01403 247407.

By Rupert Toovey, a senior director of Toovey’s, the leading fine art auction house in West Sussex, based on the A24 at Washington. Originally published in the West Sussex Gazette.

Back to School

An early photograph of pupils on the train to Christ’s Hospital
An early photograph of pupils on the train to Christ’s Hospital

Those of us with children have been reliving that back to school feeling this last weekend and sharing memories as uniforms and books are laid out in preparation for the new academic year after the long summer holidays.

Shared stories bind communities together. Christ’s Hospital’s story is encapsulated in its traditions and history and preserved in its museum, art and collections. The museum’s current exhibition ‘Christ’s Hospital in the 20th Century’ charts the school’s history during the last century and has been curated by Laura Kidner.

The interior of Christ’s Hospital School’s museum
The interior of Christ’s Hospital School’s museum

Christ’s Hospital can trace its history back to 1552. Edward VI’s role as patron and founder was enshrined in a Royal Charter shortly before his death in 1553. It is said that the young monarch was inspired to help the poor of London by a sermon given by the then Bishop of London.

The 20th century saw dramatic change for Christ’s Hospital. In 1902 it moved from its cramped London site, where it had been for some 350 years, to its current rural campus near Horsham.

My eye is taken by a photograph in the exhibition. There is little sign of a back to school feeling in the faces of the boys on the train, rather they express anticipation and excitement as they set off for Christ’s Hospital Station, perhaps for the very first time.

An earthenware figure of a Christ’s Hospital boy modelled by Harry Parr, circa 1929
An earthenware figure of a Christ’s Hospital boy modelled by Harry Parr, circa 1929

Also on display is a rare earthenware figure modelled by Harry Parr in Chelsea in 1929. It depicts a Christ’s Hospital boy wearing the famous Bluecoat uniform. The uniform has changed little since Tudor times. The long blue coat, belted at the waist is worn with matching knee breeches, yellow socks and white neck bands. It is still considered an important part of the school’s history and heritage by the students. The uniform is given to all students reflecting the school’s earliest history when clothes for the children of Christ’s Hospital were provided by the people of the City of London.

Today’s Christ’s Hospital is in many ways unique offering an independent education of the highest calibre to children with academic potential from all walks of life. It is a child’s ability and potential to benefit from a Christ’s Hospital education that determines their selection not their ability to pay. The Christian character of the Foundation and School has remained a constant in the life of Christ’s Hospital for over four and a half centuries. These values are at the heart of our nation.

For more than a century Christ’s Hospital has added to the richness of the Horsham District and remains a working school dedicated to preparing young people to flourish and contribute to our society in a changing world.

Laura Kidner is to be congratulated on this excellent exhibition. For opening times and more information on ‘Christ’s Hospital in the 20th Century’ contact the Christ’s Hospital Museum at chmuseum@christs-hospital.org.uk or telephone 01403 247444.

By Rupert Toovey, a senior director of Toovey’s, the leading fine art auction house in West Sussex, based on the A24 at Washington. Originally published in the West Sussex Gazette.

Frank Brangwyn at Christ’s Hospital School, Horsham

The interior of Christ’s Hospital School’s chapel with Frank Brangwyn’s panels
The interior of Christ’s Hospital School’s chapel with Frank Brangwyn’s panels

Frank Brangwyn (1867-1956) was an important and influential artist in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He bought a house in South Street, Ditchling called The Jointure in 1918. It was to remain his Sussex country home. He and his wife, Lucy, divided their time between London and Sussex.

In Ditchling he was reacquainted with the artist Eric Gill who had moved there in 1907. Together with a group of fellow artists Gill founded the Roman Catholic Guild of St Joseph and St Dominic at Ditchling. Thanks to their work this Sussex village had become a centre for the Arts and Crafts movement. Whilst Brangwyn was sympathetic to the cause of the craftsman artist he strongly disagreed with many of the views and practices promoted by some members of the Guild.

As a child Frank Brangwyn displayed a precocious artistic talent. His father, William, ran a thriving ecclesiastical atelier in Bruges whose output was predominately sold through his Baker Street shop in London. Brangwyn was introduced to William Morris by the renowned designer and architect Arthur Heygate Mackmurdo. In 1882, at the age of fifteen, Brangwyn began to work in the Morris workshops. He brought some of the necessary skills from having worked with his father. The young artist showed a particular gift for transferring Morris’s designs onto squared up canvases, skills necessary for the manufacture of tapestries and woodblocks for wallpapers.

‘St Wilfred First Bishop of Selsey Teaching the South Saxon’s A.D. 687’
‘St Wilfred First Bishop of Selsey Teaching the South Saxon’s A.D. 687’

Brangwyn had begun work on the panels in the chapel at Christ’s Hospital School in 1912 though they were not completed until 1923. Christ’s Hospital School was re-sited from the City of London to its current location near Horsham between 1893and 1902. The architect Sir Aston Webb, with his partner Ingress Bell, designed the Tudor-Gothic revival buildings which are still central to the school’s character today. Sir Aston Webb had supported Frank Brangwyn putting him forward for large scale projects over many years. Webb was able to secure Brangwyn the commission to paint the school’s chapel. The subjects were devised by the headmaster, the Revd. Dr A. W. Upcott. The scheme follows a procession from the earliest stories of the Church to the conversion of Britain and the mission of the Church of England.

‘St Augustine at Ebbsfleet “Turn O Lord Thy Wrath From This People” ’
‘St Augustine at Ebbsfleet “Turn O Lord Thy Wrath From This People”’

The panels are painted in tempera which gives them their luminous quality. They follow in a long tradition of wall painting in Sussex which stretches back to Saxon times. I am therefore particularly struck by the panel depicting St Wilfrid (c.633-709) who converted the South Saxons to Christianity when he came to Selsey from Northumbria and Ripon. Here he is depicted standing teaching as the Saxon’s draw in their nets. It is said that the South Saxons fished only for eels and that it was St Wilfred who taught them how to catch fish. Their first catch numbered three hundred and the amazed people turned to God. As they were baptized the rain began to fall ending three years of drought and despair. In thanks King Ethelwalh gave Wilfred eighty-seven hides of land at Selsey. St Wilfrid built a monastery and Cathedral on the Selsey peninsular which was lost when a new Cathedral was built by the Normans at Chichester. The panels show the influence of the Renaissance. Brangwyn, had visited Assisi and Venice soon after his marriage to Lucy in 1896. But these decorative paintings also show the influence of the Arts and Crafts movement, the Post-Impressionists and the strong, rich use of colour promoted by artist like Henri Matisse. The panels are united by the titled friezes with their rich blue grounds.

‘St Ambrose Training the Choir in His Church in Milan A.D. 687’
‘St Ambrose Training the Choir in His Church in Milan A.D. 687’

The panels are important not just as fine examples of Brangwyn’s work, but because they form part of a common narrative amongst modern British artists at the time who sought to reaffirm what it is to be British and to redeem our nation from the experience of the first industrialized world war. The panels are honest about the costs of standing up for righteousness with illustrations of Christian martyrs, many associated with Britain. But they are also hopeful in their vibrant Mediterranean palette, clearly depicting the triumph of good over evil.

Brangwyn articulated the view that work should be done meaningfully, to the highest standards, with humility and for the love of God rather than for gain or self-promotion. These aspirations still resonate with the school today. Christ’s Hospital is in many ways unique, offering an independent education of the highest calibre to children with academic potential, from all walks of life. It is a child’s ability and potential to benefit from a Christ’s Hospital education that determines their selection not their ability to pay. The Christian character of the Foundation and School has remained a constant in the life of Christ’s Hospital for over four and a half centuries. Christian values sustain the whole of Christ’s Hospital’s life, instilling care for the individual and tolerance whilst supplying a moral framework for the delivery of every aspect of education.

These values are at the heart of our nation and we should be grateful to all who make aspirational education and opportunity accessible to the broadest cohort of students from diverse social backgrounds. For more than a century Christ’s Hospital has added to the richness of the Horsham District by its example, outreach and patronage of the arts. It is rightly celebrated. Christ’s Hospital is a working school dedicated to preparing young people to flourish and contribute to our society. However, you can enjoy the remarkable Frank Brangwyn’s and some of the school’s artistic, architectural and historical treasures by joining one of the Verrio tours. Tours are available on Thursdays strictly by prior arrangement. For further information and to book a tour contact Lucia Brown on 01403 247407.

By Revd. Rupert Toovey. Originally published on 3rd December 2014 in the West Sussex Gazette.